USCG Required Padlocking of Onboard Sanitation Equipment

RWS

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Planning a key West trip this summer

I recall some discussion here a few years ago about a requirement to lock up the sanitation system to prevent discharge

My 1983 vessel is equipped with a 40 gallon black water tank - the head is the only source of black water.

Galley, bathroom, and wetbar sinks discharge directly overboard as well as A/C condensate and shower.

I have removed the handle from the black water overboard discharge. It is easily seen, but difficult to access, therefore that thruhull remains open.

I purchased a simple off/on key switch that I will install in the head to "LOCK OUT" the macerator, and will label it "WASTE DISCHARGE LOCKOUT"

Will this meet the requirements?

RWS
 

Cam

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Not 100% sure, but I think that just by removing the handle to prevent accidental discharge, should be enough.
 
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boatbum

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I doubt it. As I recall the thruhull has to be closed with a lock on it or, the handle has to be removed after it is closed. The notion is to prevent accidental opening of the valve. The language I have read in the past always talks to the valve. If you get boarded look out.

 
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boatbum

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You could also lock everyone out of the head LOL.

See this via google. 33 CFR 159.7(b)-(c)
 
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Good Grief

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A "No Discharge Zone" is a body of water where the discharge of treated or untreated sewage is prohibited. When operating in a No Discharge Zone, the operator must secure any overboard discharge device (for black water) in a manner that prevents discharge. Some acceptable methods are: padlocking overboard discharge valves in the closed position, using a not-releasable wire tie to hold overboard discharge valves in the closed position, closing overboard discharge valves and removing the handle, and locking the door to the space enclosing the toilets. (33CFR 159)

If your 5 para implies the overboard discharge valve is closed, or is a 3-way valve lined-up to discharge to the holding tank only and the handle is removed, you are GTG, IMHO.
 
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PascalG

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I have a key switch on mine. As long as the key isn’t left in the switch it is legal

I have also seen boats with two factory installed momentary rocker switches must be held on.
 
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missnmountains

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Literally, to "accidentally" discharge on my boat; 1. Open through hull, 2. Turn Breaker On, 3 Turn Discharge switch on. I have never "Locked" my through hull, as an "accident" would have to be on "purpose".

Ken
 
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cwms

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A "No Discharge Zone" is a body of water where the discharge of treated or untreated sewage is prohibited. When operating in a No Discharge Zone, the operator must secure any overboard discharge device (for black water) in a manner that prevents discharge. Some acceptable methods are: padlocking overboard discharge valves in the closed position, using a not-releasable wire tie to hold overboard discharge valves in the closed position, closing overboard discharge valves and removing the handle, and locking the door to the space enclosing the toilets. (33CFR 159)

If your 5 para implies the overboard discharge valve is closed, or is a 3-way valve lined-up to discharge to the holding tank only and the handle is removed, you are GTG, IMHO.

I’ve always understood that a No Discharge Zone (NDZ), you can’t discharge anything...either black or gray water. Often found on lakes and smaller harbors.
As far as black water is concerned, it cannot be discharged anywhere in the US and up to 3 miles out in the ocean.
 
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RWS

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I have a key switch on mine. As long as the key isn’t left in the switch it is legal

I have also seen boats with two factory installed momentary rocker switches must be held on.
So I'm good to go with the electrical, key switch LOCKOUT for the black water

What about the sinks & shower?

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PascalG

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The only area in the keys where you aren’t allowed to discharge grey water in over Looe Reef which is sanctuary.
 
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Good Grief

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I quoted federal law - state laws may dictate otherwise, and often contain the "no discharge of anything" requirements (e.g., in NY, Lakes.)

CWMS - actually, discharge if treated sewage is allowed within 3 nautical miles of shore except in designated "No Discharge Zone" areas. (Untreated sewage may be discharged beyond 3 nautical miles.) Again, state law may be more restrictive.
 
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November Charlie

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Planning a key West trip this summer

I recall some discussion here a few years ago about a requirement to lock up the sanitation system to prevent discharge

My 1983 vessel is equipped with a 40 gallon black water tank - the head is the only source of black water.

Galley, bathroom, and wetbar sinks discharge directly overboard as well as A/C condensate and shower.

I have removed the handle from the black water overboard discharge. It is easily seen, but difficult to access, therefore that thruhull remains open.

I purchased a simple off/on key switch that I will install in the head to "LOCK OUT" the macerator, and will label it "WASTE DISCHARGE LOCKOUT"

Will this meet the requirements?

RWS
Do you have a Y valve or is it plumbed so it all goes to the holding tank?
 
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RWS

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Do you have a Y valve or is it plumbed so it all goes to the holding tank
toilet is the only item pumped into black water tank

Black water tank has no valve per se -

There is a TEE fitting that allows for direct macerator discharge overboard OR pumpout via the deck fitting

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RWS - I think I see - toilet goes to holding tank, holding tank may go either to pump out or (via macerator) overboard, selectable by isolation valves and a tee fitting, correct?

As long as the valve to the macerator (a.k.a overboard discharge valve) is shut and locked, lockwired, or the handle is removed, you should be GTG.

" When operating in a No Discharge Zone, the operator must secure any overboard discharge device (for black water) in a manner that prevents discharge. Some acceptable methods are: padlocking overboard discharge valves in the closed position, using a not-releasable wire tie to hold overboard discharge valves in the closed position, closing overboard discharge valves and removing the handle, and locking the door to the space enclosing the toilets. (33CFR 159).
 

RWS

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the factory system used no Y valve

it's a TEE fitting

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If there's no Y-valve, there must be 2 isolation valves, one on either side of the TEE fitting - otherwise, you'd flood the holding tank w/ seawater, or, you'd never pump out the tank as you'd suck seawater back thru the macerator. Ensure the valve to the macerator is shut, wire tie/lock/remove the handle, and you're GTG.
 
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